Moringa seeds for clean water

     I wish we’d had a Moringa tree beside our dugout while growing up on the farm in northern Canada. I think Mom would have been the first to crush a couple of seeds for clean water. – Because it’s that easy. (Now, if only Moringa trees grew in northern Canada!)
     Last week Anamed International ran a ‘Natural Medicine in the Tropics’ seminar in Korntal, near Stuttgart, Germany. I’ve been using Anamed’s materials and seeds, particularly Artemisia and Moringa, for several years. The seminar was a great opportunity to deepen my knowledge. Especially the practical part – making ointments and tinctures, and water purification – were very helpful.

HansMartin Hirt watches carefully over the preparation of medicinal oil.

HansMartin Hirt watches carefully over the preparation of medicinal oil.

     Anamed is passionate about bringing good health to everyone, but especially to the poor in developing countries. I’ve written before about poor access of many Africans to clinics or doctors. Often it’s a money problem. But there is a wide variety of plants available growing in their back yard, which can prevent and treat many diseases.
     Many illnesses have their origin in impure water. That’s where the Moringa tree comes in. One or two crushed Moringa seeds in a litre of dirty water will bring it to drinking quality. It’s simple – just crush the seeds and add them to the water in your bottle. Wait one hour. Check it out on: http://www.miracletrees.org/moringa_water_purification.html .
     Participants were also shown how to make a simple sand and gravel filter. Adding a layer of charcoal would remove bacteria too. Hans Martin Hirt, Anamed founder and seminar instructor, told us: always use the purest form of water available. But it’s good to know there are options when far from clean water.

A tip-tap water faucet is a great water saving device for washing hands. The soap is handy and protected under the tin can.

A tip-tap water faucet is a great water saving device for washing hands. The soap is handy and protected under the tin can.

     Artemesia tea is awful bitter stuff. But by the third day, the tea actually tasted pretty good. I think it’s an acquired taste, like black coffee or wine. It’s a good thing, because if you want to use Artemisia tea leaves as a malaria cure, you need to drink a cup of the tea four times a day. Many will say Artemisia tea isn’t an effective cure, but Anamed dares to differ and has much research to back it up. Read more about this at: http://www.anamed.net/English_Home/anamed_artemisia_programme/anamed_artemisia_programme.html

Augustina Pauli beats her drum before a poster of tropical healing plants.

Augustina Pauli beats her drum before a poster of tropical healing plants.

     This is just a sampling of all we learned. Augustina Pauli, from Ghana, sat beside me. Coming from the African village, she knows better than all of us what it is like to live with diseases and dirty water. She can’t wait to teach her people what she has learned.
     I don’t want to give the impression Anamed is against conventional medicine. They’re the first to tell you to add a chemical treatment to Artemisia tea if fever persists, or antibiotics for bacterial diarrhoea that doesn’t heal. But many problems CAN be prevented or healed with plants, and it’s this knowledge I’m excited to carry with me as we travel to Zambia tomorrow, February 16.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Moringa seeds for clean water

  1. I had no idea that there was anything natural in the world that could purify water. Does the Moringa tree grow anywhere in the world,or is it just Africa? I have been reading about natural remedies for a while now. It seems that our planet has forgotten values that may come back into play some day. Very interesting piece.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s