May 1, 2009

This email will go from the Lusaka airport. Tonight is the last time I will really worry about mosquitos biting my bare legs at the restaurant. No more malaria fears for awhile!

Vivienne waters her vegetable garden before hurrying to her job as director's secretary. She has planted part of the garden using the conservation farming method. (Photo by Marianne Stamm)

Vivienne waters her vegetable garden before hurrying to her job as director's secretary. She has planted part of the garden using the conservation farming method. (Photo by Marianne Stamm)

Vivienne is watering her vegetable garden as we drive away from our ‘home’ this morning. She is a lively picture in her bright Chitenge wrap and head scarf. Half an hour later she will look the perfect director’s secretary. She planted the tomatoes and cabbage using the conservation farming method. It is always exciting to see people put into practice what we helped them learn.

The wheat is going into the ground at this time, following immediately on the soybean and corn harvest. I find it interesting that farmers in Zambia seed wheat at the same time western Canadian farmers do. A cool season crop, wheat can only be grown during the cooler dry season and with irrigation. We see one field that is already nicely green, the irrigation spray reflecting the afternoon sun. Nearby small farmers are stooking their corn, so it can dry out in the field.

Women accost us with their wares as we stop at a roadside market. Markets are piled high with water melons at this time of year. (Photo by Marianne Stamm)

Women accost us with their wares as we stop at a roadside market. Markets are piled high with water melons at this time of year. (Photo by Marianne Stamm)

Eva is travelling with us to Lusaka. She wants to bring some fresh vegetables to the family she is visiting so we stop at a roadside market. The stands are piled high with watermelons. They should sell well on a hot day like this one. Eva and I wonder who will eat all those melons!

Corn stalks are piled in stooks to dry out better. (Photo by Marianne Stamm)

Corn stalks are piled in stooks to dry out better. (Photo by Marianne Stamm)

I don’t feel at all like this is our last day in Zambia.  Everything is so normal, even leaving.

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